marcommlv

It’s or Its, Who’s (Or Is It Whose) to Say?

In Effective Communication, Writing on June 27, 2011 at 10:57 am

There has been a wonderful quote by British playwright Shelagh Delaney making the rounds on the Internet and Twitter recently. “Nothing passes. Everything stays with you. Everything makes it’s (sic) mark.”

But horrors! This wonderful quote also includes a glaring misuse of the maligned possessive and apostrophe. I rather doubt Shelagh Delaney used the word, “it’s,” in the original quote. “It’s” means “it is,” which doesn’t make a lot of sense in the quote.

Generally, an apostrophe indicates that a word is possessive — it shows ownership. However, it also can indicate that a letter is missing, as in a contraction. The confusion with “its” and “whose” stems from the fact that the apostrophe indicates that a letter has been left out, not that the word indicates possession.

Here’s an easy way to determine which form of these words to use. If you can replace “it’s” with “it is,” use the apostrophe. If you can replace “who’s” with “who is,” use the apostrophe. Otherwise, use the possessive version, its and whose.

How It All Began

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: